What's next for the #talentdividend?

What's next for the #talentdividend?

Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 24, 2013

Every day, more and more people become convinced of the economic value of higher ed, waking up to the potential of the Talent Dividend. So, as what's next for the project and the competition in 2013? Join us here for a live chat with Talent Dividend National Director Noel Harmon on January 29th from 2-3pm EST.

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on 2017-07-25T18:36:01+00:00
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Patrick Britton
on Jan 30, 2013
"Thanks for the shout out Noel!"
Patrick Britton
on Jan 30, 2013
"I would add a couple thoughts in response to why college attainment equals success.  First is..."
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013
"I'm inclined to suspect that the social scientists who design the surveys have ways of..."
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013
"You're most welcome, Sarah. Thank you for participating. "
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013
"Please feel free to contact me at any time. We didn't have time to do a deep dive into specific..."
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013
"Nice! Civic Commons is excited to be able to be a part of the convening, and we're looking..."
Sarah Miller
on Jan 29, 2013
"Thank you for creating a space for this dialogue. "
"Over a 25 year work life that comes out to 52,000 per year. Is this broken down by professional..."
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013
"That wraps up the "live chat" moment, but this conversation will remain open, and everyone is..."
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013
"Hi Amy! Yes, I'm super excited too!  I just got word that  we will be hearing from U.S...."
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013
"Here's a link to Carnevale's recent piece in Inside Higher Ed."
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013
"Weathering the Economic Storm: http://www.luminafoundation.org/tag/anthony_carnevale/   To..."
Amy Elliott Bragg
on Jan 29, 2013
"Noel, can you give us a sneak preview of the next National Talent Dividend meeting in..."
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013
"Big question- I definitely want to point you to Anthony Carnevale's recent report (out of..."
Michael Bennett
on Jan 29, 2013
"I was more focused on tuition, since that's an out of pocket expense for a student and requires..."
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013
"Great point, Michael! Do you mean just tuition costs? or are you also thinking about the costs of..."
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013
"Oh right!  Yes!  Folks should visit www.ceosforcities.org and click on Talent Dividend to find..."
Michael Bennett
on Jan 29, 2013
"This also rasies the question of the cost of college attainment vs. the reward. With costs..."
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013
"Nothing is too small to have an effect!  Scholarship programs are important can have a huge..."
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013
"I think Sarah wasn't asking about Houston specifically but more about how cities generally are..."
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013
"As it happens- Houston's TD efforts are amazing!  Houston's TD initiative is called My Degree..."
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013
"The latest Talent Dividend Network e-magazine has a great piece about the importance of financial..."
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013
"You bring up a very good point.  We don't see this as an either/or... Many communities in the TD..."
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013
"Great question, Sarah!"
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013
"Yes, I like think of our efforts as a "healthy" competiton.  The Talent Dividend Initiative is..."
Sarah Miller
on Jan 29, 2013
"Do you have any insight as to how the public is being involved in these initiatives?  If I live..."
"I am always curious why college attainment equals success these days? I went to a college with..."
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013
"Absolutely.  We want to be sure the reward is reflective of the effort (blood, sweat, and tears!)..."
"I've been working on collaborating with rural communities, it has been difficult to overcome the..."
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013
"I have...there is a very tight connection between cities in Northeast Ohio that are competing for..."
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013 - 2:58 pm

That wraps up the "live chat" moment, but this conversation will remain open, and everyone is invited to keep it going and share it widely with your colleagues and networks. If you have suggestions for future guests for #talentdividend live chats (or on other topics, really) please drop me a line. 

Noel--thanks so much for your time and energy!

And all of you, thanks for taking some time out of your busy day!

 

Responses(3)

Sarah Miller
on Jan 29, 2013

Thank you for creating a space for this dialogue. 

 
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013

You're most welcome, Sarah. Thank you for participating. 

 
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013

Please feel free to contact me at any time. We didn't have time to do a deep dive into specific initiatives so if you're curious please subscribe to the TD web magazine:  talentdividendnetwork.com where you can learn much more about what each city is doing.  Thanks everyone!

 
Expand This Thread
Amy Elliott Bragg
on Jan 29, 2013 - 2:48 pm

Noel, can you give us a sneak preview of the next National Talent Dividend meeting in Philadelphia? I am really excited about what we're going to learn there and the conversations we'll be having.

 

Responses(2)

Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013

Hi Amy!

Yes, I'm super excited too!  I just got word that  we will be hearing from U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan who will provide a specially taped message to the Talent Dividend conference attendees to open our conference on Monday, April 8 at 12pm.   YAY!  I just had to share that first!

The conference itself will be held in Philadelphia from 12pm on April 8th to 2:30pm on Tuesday, April 9th.  The conference location is WHYY Philadelphia located at 150 N. 6th Street (right on Independence Mall and across the street from the Liberty Bell). 

Mayor Nutter, a staunch supporter of the Philadelphia Talent Dividend will give a keynote on Tuesday morning. 

Additionally, we'll have a number of panels and break out sessions addressing cross sector collaboration, equity, and sustainability.  This meeting is FOR the cities competing so we also want to be sure there is some working and networking time built in. 

We're very excited about this year's meeting and registration will open in the next week.

 
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013

Nice! Civic Commons is excited to be able to be a part of the convening, and we're looking forward to helping spread the word and helping attendees learn how to make the most of the opportunities for online engagement.  

 
Expand This Thread
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013 - 2:34 pm

The latest Talent Dividend Network e-magazine has a great piece about the importance of financial aid, which makes me think about the "leg up" that communities might have if they have well-endowed scholarship programs. Kalamazoo, MI, for instance, recently implemented the Kalamazoo Promise, which provides full in state tuition to graduates of their public schools. Can programs like these have an impact? or are they too small to have a large scale effect?   

 

Responses(9)

Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013

Nothing is too small to have an effect!  Scholarship programs are important can have a huge impact on whether or not people are able to complete (especially those with financial need and other barriers that often prevent folks from moving forward).   One of the ways TD stands out from other iniatives though is the cross-sector collaboration around college attainment.  We konw that we cannot rely on one sector or organization to raise completion rates in a given community and sustain those rates.  Raising a community's educational attainment- (our nation's as well) will take a collective effort.

 
Michael Bennett
on Jan 29, 2013

This also rasies the question of the cost of college attainment vs. the reward. With costs varying so greatly (even with the financial aid that Dan points out), how does the Talent Dividend correlate costs with eventual economic impact?

 
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013

Great point, Michael! Do you mean just tuition costs? or are you also thinking about the costs of maintaining institutions of higher ed? 

 
Michael Bennett
on Jan 29, 2013

I was more focused on tuition, since that's an out of pocket expense for a student and requires "recovery" before the overall economic benefit is felt. I suppose the cost of maintaining (and expanding!) institutions has its own economic beneift!

 
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013

Weathering the Economic Storm:

http://www.luminafoundation.org/tag/anthony_carnevale/

 

To your next comment yes- and many cities are tackling the Talent Dividend by finding ways to help education and offset costs of tuition.  Something as simple as FAFSA workshops for both parents and students can be the difference between completing or not.

 
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013

Big question- I definitely want to point you to Anthony Carnevale's recent report (out of Georgetown) where he actually crunches the numbers and shows the potential earnings of individuals (H.S., credential, 2-year, and 4-year degrees).  This is important data- folks wtih a college degree will earn (I think it was around 1.3 million) more than those with only a high school diploma and this has a huge impact on our economy.  We know that 58% of city's economic success is directly related to the number of individuals in that city with a college degree. 

 
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013

Here's a link to Carnevale's recent piece in Inside Higher Ed.

 

Over a 25 year work life that comes out to 52,000 per year. Is this broken down by professional field or major? I don't know very many college grads who make more than 40,000 per year unless they are in a handful of specialized fields with stronger job markets. Could these professionals be inflating the numbers?

 
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013

I'm inclined to suspect that the social scientists who design the surveys have ways of controlling for that. It would be unlikely that all computer programmers, or social workers, for instance, would inflate their earnings.  

 
Expand This Thread
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013 - 2:15 pm

So... what have you learned about what works and what doesn't?

 

Responses(9)

Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013

by the way, I know that's a question that's perhaps overly broad, but I'm curious to know what those top-level learnings are.

 

I've been working on collaborating with rural communities, it has been difficult to overcome the "Competition" view of community development. People think that if my community is thriving, it means that theirs is not. I'm developing tools that can be used by a broad range of communities to bring tourism to a larger area.

 
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013

Yes, I like think of our efforts as a "healthy" competiton.  The Talent Dividend Initiative is really a catalyst for communities to compete with themselves.  It's helpful to know what others are doing (please visit our City Data page at www.ceosforcities.com) but we hope that is not what is driving the cities (and I know first-hand it isn't).  Most cities competing are looking internally at how they can foster an environment, and create positive change to promote talent development in their community.

 
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013

A few key things:

The first is collaboration.  Cities doing well are truly collaborating (across sectors) to create change in their current system.  This takes time and lots of effort.  For some cities, organizing dedicated leaders around the table from different sectors will be their biggest win from this intiative.  This should be celebrated!

The second is to do your homework.  Cities like LA have determined that one of the first things they need to do is assess the common work going on in their city before moving forward.  They did not want to reinvent the wheel. They determined who was doing what in LA and then tried to connect the dots to maximize the collective impact of everyone's work.

Finally- cities who have a dedicated person somewhere (!) heading up the Talent Divident work are able to move their projects forward.  Jolea Bryant in Houston is heading up their efforts.  She gets up thinking about the Houston TD and goes to bed thinking about it too! 

 
Sarah Miller
on Jan 29, 2013

Do you have any insight as to how the public is being involved in these initiatives?  If I live in Houston, for example, have some college but no degree how can I connect with Talent Dividend efforts?  How do I even know there is a movement to impact degree attainment numbers in my city?

 
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013

Great question, Sarah!

 
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013

As it happens- Houston's TD efforts are amazing!  Houston's TD initiative is called My Degree Counts and is housed at the Center for Houston's Future.  Jolea Bryant runs the initiative and I can provide her direct contact information following this forum!

 
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013

I think Sarah wasn't asking about Houston specifically but more about how cities generally are successfully publicizing their Talent Dividend efforts. Can you speak to any success stories there? 

 
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013

Oh right!  Yes!  Folks should visit www.ceosforcities.org and click on Talent Dividend to find not only a list of the cities competing, but contact information for each city.  You should all feel free to contact me directly too so I can provide a personal connection for you. 

 
Expand This Thread
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013 - 1:59 pm

Welcome to the live chat with Noel Harmon, National Director of the Talent Dividend project at CEOs for Cities. We'll be chatting with Noel for the next hour. I've got a ton of questions, but the point of this all is to give people a chance to ask anything about the #talentdividend.

Noel, we're really happy to have you with us. You've done a great deal for the project since you came on board about a year ago or so, right?

So, can you give us a sense of where we are as a nation and a group of communities who are competing for the Talent Dividend Prize? and tell us why 2013 is such an important year for competing cities.   

 

Responses(14)

Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013

Hi everyone!

It is so great to be here, I'm looking forward to our conversation!

The TD network has been busy this past year and I've had the honor getting to speak with folks in all of the cities competing.  Folks have organized across sectors to develop new initiatives, focus on old ones, and connect with other cities competing for the prize.  Very important as we combat critics of college attainment.

 

 
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013

Talk about the critique of college attainment that has been raised recently. Inside Higher Ed just had an interesting piece from Doug Lederman talking about the back and forth about this among academics and economists. And I know Joe Cortright, who crunches a lot of numbers for CEOs and the TDN, has a new piece in the new e-magazine. What's going on?

 
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013

2013 is also an important year as cities competing for the prize wind down the data collection phase and begin to think about how to sustain their work. Sustainability is a big issue considering the amount of time and resources that have gone into building these local cross-sector TD initiatives.

For many of us educational attainment is a "no brainer", but we see the value of educational attainment called into question when our nation goes through tough economic times (as we have recently).  So folks wonder if the value of education is a really in line with the "sky-rocketing" costs.

The Institute for Higher Education Policy released a great brief recently- (www.ihep.org) that explores our perceptions of the cost of higher education and encourages folks to look at education as an invesment.

 
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013

A quick piece of housekeeping: Be sure to refresh your browser so you can see the latest responses!

 
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013

Also, about the importance of 2013, am I right that this is the final year for data collection? And then 2014 is when the numbers get crunched and cities find out if they were, in fact, able to raise their college attainment levels? 

 
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013

Yes!  The last year of data collection is the 2012-2013 academic year.  IPEDs has about an 11th month lag, so we (and I mean Joe!) will crunch the final year numbers, do calculations for the three years, and with a committee (see prize rules) make a determination on the winner. I want folks to remember that while it is about the city who increases the number of degrees awarded, it is also about the process and effort - which is why a committee will make the final determination. 

 
Sarah Miller
on Jan 29, 2013

Have you noticed any special partnerships in regions or cities emerge from this competition that are creating traction around degree completion in interesting ways?

 
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013

I have...there is a very tight connection between cities in Northeast Ohio that are competing for the prize.  Akron, Cleveland, and Youngstown really view this initiative as an opportunity to tackle educational attainment at a regional level.  They have a signed agreement that if one of those three cities wins- they will share some of the $1 million prize with the other two cities.  They meet regularly and try to combine efforts and use one another as a resource.  The connections are key.

 
Patrick Britton
on Jan 30, 2013

Thanks for the shout out Noel!

 
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 29, 2013

Is that to prevent a winner being named where the gains were all passive (just the result of population growth, for instance), instead of a city such as Houston or Philly that are highly focused?  

 
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013

Absolutely.  We want to be sure the reward is reflective of the effort (blood, sweat, and tears!) that has gone into developing the TD in a particular city.  As I said before, developing sustianable cross sector partnership is a very time-consuming, labor intensive process. 

 

I am always curious why college attainment equals success these days? I went to a college with low admission standards, but relatively decent academic standards. There were a lot of first year drop outs because the school accepted people who weren't really college material. Why aren't we encouraging young people to enter skilled trades? It has become taboo to be a mechanic or plumber, but these jobs provide arguably more social value than a college grad with an English degree who doesn't know how his car works. 

 
Noel Harmon
on Jan 29, 2013

You bring up a very good point.  We don't see this as an either/or... Many communities in the TD network are focused on credentials and 2-year degrees because they've done an assessment and made the determination that that is what is best for their community.  We think that's great!  We hope that becoming credentialed may be lead to further academic opportunities in the future but we certainly think ANY educational attainment is important!

 
Patrick Britton
on Jan 30, 2013

I would add a couple thoughts in response to why college attainment equals success.  First is that the Census Bureau released figures in October 2012 updating their "work-life earnings" from age 25-64 and delving into the earnings by chioce of college major.  This supplements Carnevale's work in many ways. http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/education/cb12-196.html 

Secondly, I think it is important to separate college access and college attainment.  Going to college does not mean graduating from college - though we often make that assumption. Nationally, the completion rates are about 50%. So the focus on attainment equating to success stems, at least in my view, from the need to ensure those who attend college also complete college. 

Another point I would make relates to college and career readiness.  ACT (the test company that also prides itself on its extensive research) makes a case that the standards that make one "college ready" are the same as those that make one "career ready" - especially for careers in the trades.  Their example, and I apologize for not having the link handy to supply here, is that the math score needed on an ACT to do well in college is exactly the same as that needed to be in an apprentice program for various trades. 

I think I would stress that, more than college, we should think about postsecondary education as a requirement for the future. 

 
Expand This Thread
Dan Moulthrop
on Jan 28, 2013 - 3:49 pm

Welcome to the space for Tuesday's live chat with Noel Harmon, National Director of the Talent Dividend. We'll be officially starting at 2 pm (EST), but you're welcome to leave questions before then (and that has the added benefit of being the first questions in line!).