Sustainable CLE: Advanced & Renewable Energy

Sustainable CLE: Advanced & Renewable Energy

Jason Russell
on Feb 04, 2013

In tandem with energy efficiency, advanced and renewable energy is vital to continuing Cleveland’s economic revitalization. These benefits include investment opportunities in a growing industry; new jobs, both short-term construction jobs and long-term jobs in the renewable-energy supply chain; increased availability of alternative energy; and a smaller impact on our environment and natural resources. What are the economic opportunities and community benefits for 2013, the Year of Advanced and Renewable Energy? What are your ideas for supporting renewable energy at home, work, or in your community?

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What do you think?

Anonymous
on 2017-04-28T12:05:19+00:00
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Recent Activity

Robert  Drennan
on Feb 16, 2015
"    We have general consensus in our community that energy and its efficient generation &..."
Kylie B
on Jan 31, 2014
"Americans are fortunate to have an abundant supply of renewable energy resources throughout the..."
Peter DeWolfe
on Mar 04, 2013
"Our current US energy consumption is as follows by source is given here:   Prim...."
John Prim
on Feb 17, 2013
"Looks like one has to put 'ipower' in the IndieGoGo search bar to find it.  I'll just upload the..."
John Prim
on Feb 17, 2013
"It's a good question: What are your ideas for supporting renewable energy at home, work, or in..."
Laura McShane
on Feb 17, 2013
"NREL put out call for participation in Feb 2013 - did City of Cleveland submit?  I see great..."
Jenita McGowan
on Feb 17, 2013
"We often hear that the transition to renewables will be expensive and that taking innovations to..."
Jenita McGowan
on Feb 17, 2013
"I like your ideas Allen--especially about connecting individual small actions, to the larger..."
Rev. Allen V. Harris
on Feb 16, 2013
"Jason, I was pondering how these issue inspire folks on both a micro/personal level as well as..."
Jason Russell
on Feb 04, 2013
"In tandem with energy efficiency, advanced and renewable energy is vital to continuing..."

Jason Russell

Jason Russell - 2017-04-28T12:05:19+00:00 - "In tandem with energy efficiency, advanced and renewable energy is vital to continuing..."

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Robert  Drennan
on Feb 16, 2015 - 6:56 pm

    We have general consensus in our community that energy and its efficient generation & usage are worthy of our efforts and time (that’s the good news!) but, that’s where the conversation usually putters out; we need to start doing projects that build our “energy knowledge.”

    Nice looking reports with fancy graphics that give list-upon-list of statistical data concerning various aspects of the energy we use at home and on-the-job are nice when you’re trying to convince someone of the importance of it all but, are a waste of time and effort when people have already bought into the idea that “yes, this stuff is important and we want to be a part of it.” I should not say that it’s a complete waste of effort but once you have people saying “yes” to the concepts then you need to have the tools, resources and detailed project plans ready to go – people want to get their literal and proverbial hands dirty with this stuff in a way that reading a nifty report will not suffice!

    So what can we do?  Well I would propose we do these two steps (baby steps but, steps none-the-less) to start the process of “planning & doing;”

Step 1 - Let’s find the people who want to be on the team and can bring some knowledge & passion with them: you don’t have to be Sheldon Cooper from the sitcom Big Bang Theory, you just need to have some basic understanding and skills and a whole lot of determination.

Step 2 – Find some money. This will be the darned hardest part but, if we can find folks in step 1 with financial knowledge (how to get it, how to use it and how to account & manage it) and put them together with the folks that can lay out the technical aspects of a project then we can start getting folks really excited and involved with this thing you can’t really see, touch or smell called energy.

The hardest part of anything is always starting – we’ve started so let’s push deeper into the jungle!

 
Kylie B
on Jan 31, 2014 - 4:57 am

Americans are fortunate to have an abundant supply of renewable energy resources throughout the United States. However, according to the Strategic Directions in the United States Electric Utility Industry Survey, the power utilities sector was gone through fundamental basic changes. It displayed an industry on the brink of change. Source of article: Utility industry in transition.

 
Peter DeWolfe
on Mar 04, 2013 - 11:23 pm

Our current US energy consumption is as follows by source is given here:

 

Prim. energy

Production

Import

 

TWh

TWh

TWh

2004

27,050

19,085

8,310

2007

27,214

19,366

8,303

2008

26,560

19,841

7,379

2009

25,155

19,613

6,501

2010

25,776

20,056

6,205

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_in_the_United_States

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We need to replace our fossil fuel energy sources with renewables…

 

“The potential of solar energy is tremendous. The solar resource is good in every state; even Alaska has the equivalent solar resource of Germany, the largest solar market in the world today. Scientists estimate that worldwide as much as 600 terawatts of solar energy could be captured.”

http://www.innovation-america.org/renewables-research-progress-report

 

There are but 2-4 terawatts of wind power that can be captured.(slide 33)

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=2-4%20terawatts%20wind%20caltech&source=web&cd=1&sqi=2&ved=0CC8QFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fnsl.caltech.edu%2F_media%2Fenergy%3Aenergy6.pdf&ei=AFg1Ucm3Deiy2gW3yoDYBQ&usg=AFQjCNG6u6d-Mc7GguQIH6dSsza4bWPqRQ

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Perhaps it might be wise forClevelandandNortheast Ohioto look more into solar as a potential solution to our energy hungry societal problems, and less into the pipe dream that the world wide wind corporations would have us subscribe to.

 
John Prim
on Feb 17, 2013 - 3:23 pm

It's a good question: What are your ideas for supporting renewable energy at home, work, or in your community?And i agree it takes small individual actions, when multplied by many, that make a significan impact to transform and transiton.  I think sometimes the small and practical get's lost from sight most the time with the 'big fix' taking most the 'spotlight'....And there's the bottleneck - before one can transition in action, one must transform in thought.  And there is a knowledge gap - both for what is feasable with current technology and economically viable - both now and far into the future.  Our economic signals (it has become an unnecessary bottleneck against renewables, imo) are filled with noise to keep fossils propped up.  If the market were truly level (or even more balanced) - then one recognizes we're already at grid parity.What have I done?  What I could do to both increase knowledge and action for renewables - starting with small steps...Today, I started 'Solar for Sandy'.  In the gallery is a PDF file demonstrating how small solar can make a big diffrerence for increasing security and mitigating climate change.  Such education to build awareness is necessary to truly transform, imo....It's a start for active transition to a solar powered world.  (Hmmm - Try the link again - should work this time)      

 

Responses(1)

John Prim
on Feb 17, 2013

Looks like one has to put 'ipower' in the IndieGoGo search bar to find it.  I'll just upload the file here: 

 
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Jenita McGowan
on Feb 17, 2013 - 8:04 am

We often hear that the transition to renewables will be expensive and that taking innovations to scalable installations will take time.

I am curious what committment you or your organization have made in transitioning to advanced and renewable energy? What price are you willing to pay to invest in a future less dependent on fossil fuels (not just in money, but in time and in human resources)? And, why do you think it is worth it? 

If you're taking action, I invite you to share it here and offer your reasons behind it. We like picutres and links to provide greater depth and understanding.  

 
Jason Russell
on Feb 04, 2013 - 8:33 pm

In tandem with energy efficiency, advanced and renewable energy is vital to continuing Cleveland’s economic revitalization. These benefits include investment opportunities in a growing industry; new jobs, both short-term construction jobs and long-term jobs in the renewable-energy supply chain; increased availability of alternative energy; and a smaller impact on our environment and natural resources.

What are the economic opportunities and community benefits for 2013, the Year of Advanced and Renewable Energy? What are your ideas for supporting renewable energy at home, work, or in your community?

 

Responses(3)

Rev. Allen V. Harris
on Feb 16, 2013

Jason,

I was pondering how these issue inspire folks on both a micro/personal level as well as a macro/communal level. What if a "fair" were hosted in which half of the exhibits were focused on how an individual, household, organization or business could engage in energy efficiency, renewable energy, and advanced technologies while the other half show what is possible on a city-wide or regional basis?  What I'm thinking about are the studies that show that while individual actions may feel good, they are not effective in really changing the course of history (so to speak).  We need to find ways to support such individual commitments while putting them into perspective and linking them to the support of larger and more effective efforts that really *will* make a difference for the future.  

Thanks for your wisdom!  

Allen

 
Jenita McGowan
on Feb 17, 2013

I like your ideas Allen--especially about connecting individual small actions, to the larger transformations needed to make significant impact. It is hard to figure out how to involve the average resident in Advanced and Renewable Energy. Some ideas we have are educating citizens about Community Solar. I've put a link below to the National Renewable Energy Lab's guide to Community Solar. 

 
Laura McShane
on Feb 17, 2013

NREL put out call for participation in Feb 2013 - did City of Cleveland submit?  I see great potential for distributed energy through churches, schools and libraries, especially.

 
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