Reverse transfers, the hidden opportunity...

Reverse transfers, the hidden opportunity explained

Emily Cole
on Jul 23, 2012

Reverse transfers are helping cities boost college attainment rates. The process seems simple, right? On the way to a BA or BS, students grab an Associate's degree. But how does it work? Are some state systems set up better than others to streamline this process? And who needs to be involved to make it happen?

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Anonymous
on 2017-07-25T18:36:17+00:00
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Jay Corwin
on Aug 01, 2012
"The University of Central Oklahoma is leading an initiative with some of our top feeder community..."
Maggie McGrath
on Jul 24, 2012
"As Shawn mentions above, the Higher Education Compact of Greater Cleveland, under the leadership..."
TALENT 2025
on Jul 24, 2012
"Grand Rapids Community College signed an agreement with the West Michigan colleges and..."
Shawn Brown
on Jul 24, 2012
"Although not a new idea, the notion of a reverse transfer is certainly a good way to promote and..."
Emily Cole
on Jul 23, 2012
"Below is a link to some brief background about University of Houston's reverse transfer..."

Emily Cole

Emily Cole - 2017-07-25T18:36:17+00:00 - "Reverse transfers are helping cities boost college attainment rates. The process seems simple,..."

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Jay Corwin
on Aug 01, 2012 - 9:47 pm

The University of Central Oklahoma is leading an initiative with some of our top feeder community colleges to help establish a consistent and easy reverse transfer process in Oklahoma.  We started a very quick pilot project last December and within two months had assisted three community colleges in awarding over 150 associate degrees.  We recently received a grant from the TG Foundation in Texas to escalate this program and hopefully establish a highly replicable process for anyone else.  This is a very exciting process that is quickly spreading around the country (especially since Lumina and Kreskge started pushing it).   We expect at least 200 more associate degrees will be posted by the end of this calendar year.  Hopefully, much more to come....

 
Maggie McGrath
on Jul 24, 2012 - 4:20 pm

As Shawn mentions above, the Higher Education Compact of Greater Cleveland, under the leadership of Mayor Frank Jackson, has begun its own reverse transfer program with Tri-C and the 14 senior institutions that are part of the Compact.  We hope to report significant progress on this in the next year as we continue to strive to increase the number of Cleveland students who are ready for, have access to and complete college.

 
TALENT 2025
on Jul 24, 2012 - 3:39 pm

Grand Rapids Community College signed an agreement with the West Michigan colleges and universities it feeds into in June 2011.  Data on the number of students who have been awarded degrees will be available early this fall.  The three other community colleges in our 13-county initiative will complete similar agreements later this year.

 
Shawn Brown
on Jul 24, 2012 - 2:28 pm

Although not a new idea, the notion of a reverse transfer is certainly a good way to promote and increase college completion.  InsideHigherEd just ran a story on it today: Forks in the Road.  Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C) has awarded 182 associate's degrees since 2009 to students who transferred to Baldwin Wallace University, Cleveland State University, the University of Akron, and Ursuline College.  Certainly more can be done and the Higher Education Compact in Cleveland is exploring ways to expand Tri-C's program.

 
Emily Cole
on Jul 23, 2012 - 9:39 am
Below is a link to some brief background about University of Houston's reverse transfer initiative, which was highlighted at the National Talent Dividend conference earlier this year. So, who else is trying this? How hard has it been to set up and operationalize?     Navigation Reverse Transfer Initiative This program has been in the works since 2005 and finally lifted off in fall 2010. It involves returning transcripts of UH transfer students to their feeder community colleges for evaluation, with the goal that these students will be awarded associate's degrees from their previous institutions based on the credit hours acquired while earning their bachelor's at UH.