How do we define talent? What's working in your...

How do we define talent? What's working in your city?

Emily Cole
on Jul 30, 2012

Talent can be found everywhere. It's in your neighborhood, your city, and in every state across our nation. What are the ways you measure talent and what's the good work you're doing around the concept of talent?

Participants (10) See All

What do you think?

Anonymous
on 2017-07-25T18:36:09+00:00
Login or Register to contribute to this conversation

Recent Activity

Emily Cole
on Aug 03, 2012
"Hadass and Shawn: We would love to hear more from you both and I think that there will be many..."
Emily Cole
on Aug 03, 2012
"There are so many ways to measure talent in cities nationwide, and another question is how will..."
Joseph Cortright
on Aug 02, 2012
"There are lots of ways to measure talent.  With the talent dividend, our headline measure is the..."
Emily Cole
on Aug 02, 2012
"Congratulations on setting up such a successful model! Not only did you create a winning..."
Hadass Sheffer
on Aug 02, 2012
"Back in 2004, Philadelphia quantified one of our talent issues: while we educate about 300,000..."
Emily Cole
on Aug 02, 2012
"Let's take the conversation to another level, and talk about metrics.   Joe-perhaps you can..."
Joseph Cortright
on Jul 31, 2012
"Talent is multi-dimensional, as Blair emphasizes.  And increasingly, I think we have to look to..."
Emily Cole
on Jul 31, 2012
"It's safe to say that we all value talent, and that it's vitally important to not only cities,..."
"Hi Shawn, Sounds like you are on the right track! 55,000 Degrees in Louisville is a great..."
Emily Cole
on Jul 31, 2012
"Thank you, Blair, for your transparency in sharing your work in St. Louis! Your definitions of..."
Noel Harmon
on Jul 31, 2012
"Thanks Emily and Joe!  We are so thrilled to have launched the Talent Dividend Network Web..."
Emily Cole
on Jul 31, 2012
"That's a great question, Shawn, and one I would imagine a lot of TDN members are wondering. It's..."
Joseph Cortright
on Jul 31, 2012
"Denise, thanks for reminding us that talent is something more than just earning the degree.  It..."
Denise Bauer Reid
on Jul 31, 2012
"Our conversation is around life long learning - continuing education - post secondary..."
Shawn Brown
on Jul 31, 2012
"I would like to ask another question.  What are cities and regions doing to promote college..."
Blair Forlaw
on Jul 31, 2012
"Below is how we defined talent in the preface to our regional strategy for St. Louis.  I know:..."
Shawn Brown
on Jul 31, 2012
"We have take the same approach in Northeast Ohio by clearly defining our goal of 1,000,000..."
Emily Cole
on Jul 31, 2012
"I posed these questions yesterday, but wanted to entice more of the talent dividend community to..."
Joseph Cortright
on Jul 30, 2012
"Its important to be clear about your goals, and to aim high:  Louisville's doing both of those..."
Joseph Cortright
on Jul 30, 2012
"  Great observation, Dayrl.  We know that talent is a lot more than just the tradition 3 "Rs",..."
Emily Cole
on Jul 30, 2012
"Thanks Mary Gwen! I know 55,000 Degrees is doing really fabulous work in Louisville, KY, and..."
Emily Cole
on Jul 30, 2012
"Thanks for your willingness to be part of this conversation, Joe. I think I can speak for the..."
Mary Gwen Wheeler
on Jul 30, 2012
shared a link: "Increasing Educational Attainment in Louisville, KY | 55,000 Degrees"
Daryl Rowland
on Jul 30, 2012
"F. Scott Fitzgerald said, "The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two..."
Joseph Cortright
on Jul 30, 2012
"Good morning everyone.  Looking forward to our conversation--building talent is fast becoming the..."
Emily Cole
on Jul 30, 2012
"How do you define talent in your city? Check out this short video of how Joe Cortright defines..."

Emily Cole

Emily Cole - 2017-07-25T18:36:09+00:00 - "Talent can be found everywhere. It's in your neighborhood, your city, and in every state across..."

Continue Reading

Emily Cole
on Jul 30, 2012
"Joe Cortright said: "The Talent Dividend is based upon the observation that there's a very strong..."
Emily Cole
on Aug 02, 2012 - 10:39 am

Let's take the conversation to another level, and talk about metrics.

 

Joe-perhaps you can tell the group a bit about how to measure talent? And, what that means?

 

What is your opinion as far as evidence-based proof when talking about higher education and talent related to higher education? Is it right there waiting to be gathered from the community and from educational institutions or does it take a great deal of hard work to measure?

Do you have thoughts on how an institution can create a structure to measure both assessment and feedback from students/faculty?

Are any of you promoting technology enabled assessments from students throughout the calendar year to gauge both success and failure of an academic system?

 

Take a moment to watch the video of Houston's Mayor, Annise Parker, talk with Lee Fisher about the value of talent in her city.

 

Responses(2)

Joseph Cortright
on Aug 02, 2012

There are lots of ways to measure talent.  With the talent dividend, our headline measure is the percentage of the adult population (those 25 and older) who have completed a four-year degree.  But obviously, there's a lot more to it than that.  We also urge communities to look carefully at measuring progress every step along the educational continuum:  are young childrend ready to learn when they enter schoo?  How is your community's high school graduation rate?  What fraction of those who complete high school enroll in post-secondary education?  How many of them finish?  And are adults getting continuing education.  We've developed a set of metrics that shed light on how each talent dividend community is doing in each of these areas--and you can view my powerpoint presentation explaining each of these measures on line at:

 

https://s3.amazonaws.com/com.theciviccommons.misc/Reports/Cortright+-+Talent+Dividend.pdf

 
Emily Cole
on Aug 03, 2012

There are so many ways to measure talent in cities nationwide, and another question is how will cities both measure talent and share their results. It makes a lot of sense to start measuring progress as early as possible. The focus has been to start gathering date (in some cases) during high school and into college as opposed to during the entire educational journey. 

 

P-16 is loosely defined as a student-focused, comprehensive and integrated system that links ALL levels of education (P=preschool through college). It's a term that's used by both educators and policymakers with a goal of improving education as a whole. In Ohio there's the Eastern Ohio P-16 Partnership for Educatio: http://www.easternohiop16.org/

During the Houston TDN conference we interviewed Stephanie Shaw, Executive Director for the Easter Ohio P-16 Partnership. Take a look at her video below!

 

 
Expand This Thread
Emily Cole
on Jul 31, 2012 - 4:17 pm

It's safe to say that we all value talent, and that it's vitally important to not only cities, but to the future of the country to invest in the talent in your city, state, or region.

 

Having said that, how does your organization implement new or innovative ways to keep talent at home? And, how do colleges, universities, and local businesses and corporations foster that desire to stay in your city? 

 

Check out the video of James M. Douglas, Vice President at Texas Southern University talks below about the value of independent learning from cradle to college. (There are a number of other videos on our brand new Talent Dividend Network YouTuve Channel, too!)

 

Responses(2)

Hadass Sheffer
on Aug 02, 2012

Back in 2004, Philadelphia quantified one of our talent issues: while we educate about 300,000 students each year in our 101+ colleges and universities, not all of them choose to stay here.  At the time, a study done by the Knowledge Industry Partnership which was led by the Economy League found that only a quarter of these students stayed here after graduation.  To address this problem, Campus Philly formed, and developed a winning strategy for keeping new talent: Attract, Engage, Retain.  As a result, more than two-thirds of new grads now stay in our region. 

Highlights of Campus Philly's approach include connecting students to employers by way of networking, internships, and job placements, and engaging them in the cultural and community life of Philadelphia.  It's working!

 
Emily Cole
on Aug 02, 2012

Congratulations on setting up such a successful model!

Not only did you create a winning strategic model, but you're sharing it with other cities, right? What other cities are you working with to help them retain thier recent graduates? Do you have thoughts on how cities could begin this really important work? 

Folks, take a look at the way that Herman Miller forged a new partnership with Campus Philly below!

 
Expand This Thread
Blair Forlaw
on Jul 31, 2012 - 9:13 am

Below is how we defined talent in the preface to our regional strategy for St. Louis.  I know: this definition is not easily quantifiable.  But it's a great dialogue-starter for collaborations. It encourages us to question our assumptions and get what we believe out on the table."Talented people are capable of many things.  They:

  • Have developed their "natural ability to do something well" (The Dictionary)
  • Demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform jobs in demand in today's knowledge economy (O*Net)
  • Exhibit a "recurring pattern of thought, feeling, or behavior that can be productively applied" in the workplace (Gallup Management Journal)
  • Are "a good fit" with the culture of the organization or situation in which they work (St. Louis area employers)
  • Can think creatively (The Economist)
  • Have a continuing "hunger for learning" (Malcolm Gladwell)

Without a workforce that has all these qualities, metro economies cannot thrive in the global marketplace."

 

Responses(2)

Emily Cole
on Jul 31, 2012

Thank you, Blair, for your transparency in sharing your work in St. Louis! Your definitions of talent are all relevant, and I think many of us can apply these to either ourselves, groups/organizations that we belong, or our city. Below I've posted an article about talent and why it matters.

 
Joseph Cortright
on Jul 31, 2012

Talent is multi-dimensional, as Blair emphasizes.  And increasingly, I think we have to look to foster the talent of all of our citizens.  In this vein, I really like the recommendations put forward by Frank Levy and Richard Murnane about what they call "the new basic skills"--which include not just the hard math and problem solving skills, but the "soft" skills of working in groups and making effective oral and writen presentations. 

 

 
Expand This Thread
Emily Cole
on Jul 31, 2012 - 8:10 am

I posed these questions yesterday, but wanted to entice more of the talent dividend community to become engaged and have a voice in this conversation. Here's a repost of a few questions, and some new ones, too: 

How do YOU define talent in your city? What percentage of your adult population has completed a four-year degree? Institutions are devising creative, thoughtful strategies and implementing highly effective initiatives to attract and retain talented people. How is your organization keeping talented college graduates at home? What's truly working in your city?

How do the colleges and universities in your city collectively work towards improving educational attainment? It’s one thing to work on improvement as a single institution, but how do you do this as a collective?

 

Responses(3)

Denise Bauer Reid
on Jul 31, 2012

Our conversation is around life long learning - continuing education - post secondary enrollment.  If we focus strictly on degree completion we are creating an exclusive not inclusive conversation.

We have a strong manufacturing sector in our region and there is a lack of awareness by the community at large, parents, students and educators about the incredible opportunties afforded to indivdiduals with high demand certificates and training.

Manufacturing careers are deemed as "dirty jobs" not high tech or highly skilled...changing perceptions around this is critical for the ongoing success our economy.

We have been working to educate our community on what our power sectors are in northeastern Oklahoma which is a foundational piece that has been missing from education --- do we want to steer kids to particular industry or companies? No, but kids should explore and know what opporutnities are available in their own community if they want to create a sustainable life here. 

  • Talent = People
  • Talent = Skills
  • Talent = Attitude
  • Talent = Development
  • Talent = Knowledge
  • Talent = Demand
  • Talent = Communication
  • Talent = Emerging
  • Talent = Creative
  • Talent = Innovation
  • Talent = Inclusion
  • Talent = Collaboration   

Workforce is such a complex topic that if you don't build awareness around business community and our local economy it can be difficult to create buy in. 

Our systems are like big ships that turn slowly and we have business needs that are moving at lightening speed...it's a daunting task but with lots of promise. Connecting people to opportunity.

Love all the comments to this question. Thanks for inviting me to the conversation.

 
Joseph Cortright
on Jul 31, 2012

Denise, thanks for reminding us that talent is something more than just earning the degree.  It clearly is about life-long learning and steadily improving and broadening one's skills.  A key message of the talent dividend is that the economic gains come from improving attainment at every step along the way--getting more kids to complete high school, moving more graduates on to college, and also raising the number of college graduates.

We economists tend to use degree attainment as a rough proxy for identifying those folks who are more likely (on average) to have a high level of skills and talent, and who are upgrading those skills.  As a statistical generalization, that's right, but misses the fact that there are many talented folks who lack degrees and many folks with degrees who could be a lot more talented.

But importantly, degree attainment matters to employers in the labor market.  And its foundational:  equipping your citizens with an adequate education is really the key to driving your economy, and this is becoming increasingly true.

But as Denise points out--you can't stop there.  Adult education and continuing education are important to sharpen and improve skills, and to help those who might not have gotten all the education they need when they were younger.

 
Noel Harmon
on Jul 31, 2012

Thanks Emily and Joe!  We are so thrilled to have launched the Talent Dividend Network Web magazine and engagement platform!  Thank you to Joe for being available for an entire week and to Emily for continuing the conversation on Talent.  I've just come from a Lumina Convening where we discussed Talent and specifically that un-tapped talent that lives in all of our cities.  There is no magic bullet or secret sauce (as our president Lee Fisher likes to say) but we do know developing talent is key to growing and sustaining our great American cities.

I look forward to joining you in more conversations and thank you all for engaging in this first week, having you all connect to one another is wonderful and I hope will prove to be an invaluable resource for all of you!

 

 
Expand This Thread
Joseph Cortright
on Jul 30, 2012 - 11:49 am

Good morning everyone.  Looking forward to our conversation--building talent is fast becoming the critical strategy for improving local economies.  There are lots of lessons and examples from around the country, and this forum can be a great place to pull them all together. 

 

Responses(7)

Daryl Rowland
on Jul 30, 2012

F. Scott Fitzgerald said, "The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function." Talent is the ability to bring together two or more disparate ideas or activities and fuse them into something that has never existed before. Therefore, developing and attracting talent requires seeking and encouraging citizens who can think across specialized disciplines and bring new and useful things into the world.  Sadly, education is not currently moving in this direction. On the upside, in cities around the country, the urban core is having a renaissance and that is good for cross-pollination.

 
Joseph Cortright
on Jul 30, 2012

 

Great observation, Dayrl.  We know that talent is a lot more than just the tradition 3 "Rs", and has to encompass critical thinking, teamwork, and communication skills as well.  We've got to integrate disprate ideas and generate new ones.  There's pretty abundant evidence that on average, those who have completed a college degree are more adaptable to changing circumstances, technology and work organization, which is why having a well educated workforce is so important to employers.  But perhaps more importantly, a well-educated population is important to enabling a community to have resilience in the face of economic change.

 
Mary Gwen Wheeler
on Jul 30, 2012
 
Emily Cole
on Jul 30, 2012

Thanks Mary Gwen! I know 55,000 Degrees is doing really fabulous work in Louisville, KY, and we're looking forward to hearing more about your work this week.

 
Joseph Cortright
on Jul 30, 2012

Its important to be clear about your goals, and to aim high:  Louisville's doing both of those things with 55,000 degrees.  This sends an unambiguous message to the public and educational institutions, and is a great starting point for the discussion of what it will take to improve educational attainment. 

 
Shawn Brown
on Jul 31, 2012

We have take the same approach in Northeast Ohio by clearly defining our goal of 1,000,000 college degree holders by 2014.  In addition, the metrics we use to track our progress toward our Northeast Ohio Talent Dividend goals are published on NOCHE's website: http://www.noche.org/175.

 
Emily Cole
on Jul 30, 2012

Thanks for your willingness to be part of this conversation, Joe. I think I can speak for the network in saying that we're looking forward to a productive and meaningful conversation this week! If anyone has any questions or issues please feel free to email me: emilycole@theciviccommons.com

 
Expand This Thread
Emily Cole
on Jul 30, 2012 - 8:52 am

Joe Cortright said: "The Talent Dividend is based upon the observation that there's a very strong correlation between the level of an areas education as measured by the percentage of the population with a four-year degree and the economic success of that region as measured by per capita economy." The focus for cities across the country is talent, and that's exactly the the topic of conversation for our week-long moderated forum featuring Joe Cortright. There are 57 cities competing for the Talent Dividend Prize (thanks to the Lumina and Kresge Foundations) with the end result being a chance to win the one million dollar prize. Yet, the prize is meant to light a fire under cities that will ultimately change the way they define talent and spur on lasting positive economic changes. 

 

If we were to boost the number of college graduates by a single percentage point in cities nationtwide what do you think would happen? There would be a dramatic economic impact on cities. In Northeast Ohio, for example, it would be a $2.8 billion surge in their economy. If we take it one step further, the percentage of college graduates in a city account for 58% of a cities economic success if measured by per capita income. According to Joe Cortright it's quite simple: the more college degrees in a city means a more well educated city --which in turn means a more robust economy. 

 

Our conversation with Joe Cortright will cover an array of topics, and we encourage you to pose new questions, challenge one another, support one another, and most importantly, learn from one another. We're going to discuss talent in your city and how it's defined on a broader level, metrics and benchmarks used to measure talent, and the talent dividend prize.

 

How do YOU define talent in your city? What percentage of your adult population has completed a four-year degree? Institutions are devising creative, thoughtful strategies and implementing highly effective initiatives to attract and retain talented people. How is your organization keeping talented college graduates at home? What's truly working in your city?

 

Responses(5)

Emily Cole
on Jul 30, 2012

How do you define talent in your city? Check out this short video of how Joe Cortright defines the Talent Dividend Network.

 
Shawn Brown
on Jul 31, 2012

I would like to ask another question.  What are cities and regions doing to promote college attainment among adults with some college and no degree?  The number of people in Northeast Ohio age 25 or older in this category is more than half a million.  One way that we are focusing on that population is by identifying ways to promote and expand prior learning assessment.  What other approaches are you using to put this cohort on a pathway to a degree?

 
Emily Cole
on Jul 31, 2012

That's a great question, Shawn, and one I would imagine a lot of TDN members are wondering. It's easy to see college attainment through the lens of an individual or organizational viewpoint. Having talked to a growing number of people on the phone, there a number of different strategies. In all honesty, I think this topic might make sense for a future moderated conversation.

 

Hi Shawn,

Sounds like you are on the right track!

55,000 Degrees in Louisville is a great example of the community organizing to get more youth and adults to go to college and complete degrees.  

Another regional approach is the Graduate! model: in Philadelphia -  www.GraduatePhiladelphia.org, in Connecticut - www.Graduatect.org, in Memphis - www.GraduateMemphis.org and related, www.CompleteTheDegree.org in Chicago. 

The Graduate! model focuses on adults with some credits.  We promote a triple approach: 1. Raise awareness among all stakeholders, including individuals, about the importance of completing a degree and how to return to college and be successful, 2. Influence policies and practices within stakeholder organizations, and 3. deliver direct support services to adults who want to finish a degree.  Support services help people who started but never finished a degree - we call them Comebackers - from the decision to return to college through completion of a 4-year degree.  We offer guidance and advising, one-on-one as well as workshops and some online services.

I'll gladly provide more details if anyone is interested.

Hadass

Hadass ShefferPresident, The Graduate! Network, Inc. 

 
Emily Cole
on Aug 03, 2012

Hadass and Shawn: We would love to hear more from you both and I think that there will be many more opportunities to share both the resources you've used, best practices, and what's working in your cities. We plan on having moderated conversations on a monthly basis, and as TDN members familarize themselves with our site I expect the conversations to grow and become more robust. Thank you and please keep on sharing resrouces with me at: emilycole@theciviccommons.com

 
Expand This Thread