Fracking Moratorium

Fracking Moratorium

Susan  alcorn
on Mar 17, 2012

Given the rush to drill with insufficient regulations, we need a moratorium until the US EPA completes its preliminary study this year and a complete report in 2014. Fracking is exempt from the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and the Safe Drinking Water Act.

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What do you think?

Anonymous
on 2014-09-19T09:48:22+00:00
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Susan  alcorn
on Mar 21, 2012
"I thought I was participating in the discussion.  What steps should I take. "
Susan  alcorn
on Mar 21, 2012
"I didn't realize all the other environmental regulations that oil and gas were exempted from. ..."
Tara Stitzlein
on Mar 20, 2012
"Are you participating in the Future of Shale Development discussion? You should bring up this..."
Kathryn Hanratty
on Mar 19, 2012
"I agree that a moratorium is the most responsible action. When there is verifiable proof that..."
Dan Pilkington
on Mar 18, 2012
"I agree with you! A state-wide moratorium for Ohio would be nice, but I've never heard it..."

Susan  alcorn

Susan alcorn - 2014-09-19T09:48:22+00:00 - "Given the rush to drill with insufficient regulations, we need a moratorium until the US EPA..."

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Kathryn Hanratty
on Mar 19, 2012 - 3:08 pm

I agree that a moratorium is the most responsible action. When there is verifiable proof that this can be done in a way that will not cause dangers human health and the environment, then we can think about allowing this on a limited basis.

At minimum the Shale drillers must be held to the same standards as other industries. If they cannot operate within the bounds of The Clean water Act, The Clean Air Act, The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, The Safe Drinking Water Act, The National Environmental Policy Act and The Toxic Release Inventory under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act then they should not be in business.

 I think that if Environmental concerns were weighted properly it would be obvious that the cost is much greater than the reward for this business.

 

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Susan  alcorn
on Mar 21, 2012

I didn't realize all the other environmental regulations that oil and gas were exempted from.  What a list! 

I just found out today that the City Club of Cleveland is having a forum on fracking on Friday, March 30 w/Jack Shaner, Executive Director of the Ohio Enviornmental Council & Mike Chadfey, Energy in Depth--the other side.  I encourage everyone to go.  Tickets are $18/City Club Members & $30.00 if you're not a member.  It's worth the money to have your voice heard, especially if you're anti-fracking because these points have not been made in the regular media. 

 
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Dan Pilkington
on Mar 18, 2012 - 3:42 pm

I agree with you!

A state-wide moratorium for Ohio would be nice, but I've never heard it suggested before so I'm guessing it wouldn't be an easy task.  You didn't say "state", so you're suggesting a national moratorium?

From what I've been reading, opposition has come mainly from local governments in New York and Pennsylvania, although New York's state-wide ban under Gov. Patterson was certainly helpful.

But in the counties in the area where I live in Ohio - Jefferson, Harrison, Columbiana - I hardly hear a peep of protest, and virtually no uncertainty at all from lawmakers.  The news is full of exiting new opportunities, a revitalization of the Ohio Valley, etc.  That's why I'm wondering how practical a state-wide ban might be.

Sure would be better to get something positive on the state books before the Ohio legislature and Gov. Kasich pull an "Act 13" like they did in PA last month trying to override all local ordinances.

The gas has been down there for millions of years.  Seems the rush is to get to it before the public realizes the true risks involved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Susan  alcorn
on Mar 17, 2012 - 10:16 pm

We need a balance between the three 3 "E's", our need for energy, the environment, and the economy.  There are few incentives to conserve energy and work toward our long term sustainable goals.  There's tremendous pressure to produce gas and oil regardless of the environmental risks of fracking (air, water, and  earthquakes) or growing questions about the financial stability of companies such as Chesapeake.  Today's PD noted that Chesapeake had a 10.3 billion debt load with gas trading near a 10 year low.  The rush to drill has serious consequences, especially since this industry is exempt from the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Safe Drinking Water Act.  It's time for a moratorium until the EPA can complete its preliminary study this year, and its final one in 2014. 

 

Responses(2)

Tara Stitzlein
on Mar 20, 2012

Are you participating in the Future of Shale Development discussion? You should bring up this arguement. 

 
Susan  alcorn
on Mar 21, 2012

I thought I was participating in the discussion.  What steps should I take. 

 
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